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Publication Title | Energy Conservation and CO2 Emission Reduction Using Cogeneration Based on Gas Microturbine

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Research Journal of Applied Sciences, Engineering and Technology 6(21): 3953-3958, 2013

ISSN: 2040-7459; e-ISSN: 2040-7467

© Maxwell Scientific Organization, 2013

Submitted: January 23, 2013 Accepted: April 12, 2013 Published: November 20, 2013

Energy Conservation and CO2 Emission Reduction Using Cogeneration Based on Gas Microturbine

1Arezoo Khalili, 1Iman Roohi Dehkordi and 2Sadegh Khalili

1Young Researchers Club, Saveh Branch, Islamic Azad University, Saveh, Iran 2Mechanical Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, 424 Hafez Avenue, Tehran, Iran

Abstract: Daily increasing propagation of environmental pollutants, such as CO2 as the most prevailing greenhouse gas, has resulted in global warming and climate changes in the past decades. Therefore, essentiality of the optimum utilization of limited sources of energy which in turn leads to emission abatement in energy conversion process is being widely under consideration. Cogeneration, regarding energy conservation and efficiency enhancement, is known to be a noticeable and overriding strategy in substantiation of energy consumption management goal. This study deals with performance evaluation of a microturbine-based cogeneration plant and its effects on efficiency and environmental aspects by using a simulator code.

Keywords: Cogeneration, CO2 emission reduction, microturbine

INTRODUCTION

Cogeneration, also known as Combined Heat and Power (CHP), as a natural method of Distributed Generation (DG) paradigm has major privileges like efficiency enhancement, fuel saving and emission reduction (Horlock, 1987; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2002).

Pervasion of the liberalized electricity market over the past decades, following by a decline in the price of electricity, is considered to be an obstacle in widespread substitution of current large-scale separate heat and power production systems with cogeneration plants. On the other hand, this liberalization has reduced electricity price predictability in long term, thus neglecting tendencies towards conventional plants with massive investment. As a result, a great opportunity to utilize small-scale cogeneration plants is obtainable (Alanne and Saari, 2004).

The basis of cogeneration lies in thermal energy recovery in production cycles which had been carried out for large-scale conventional power plants in the past. However, one of the most promising objectives exists in small-scale residential and commercial applications like hospitals, hotels, service sectors or office buildings which are being extensively considerable for the present (Onovwiona and Ugursal, 2006).

Despite the fact that there is not a unique and comprehensive definition of small systems, generally the range of electrical power less than 200 kW is considered as small-scale cogeneration. Nowadays

micro gas turbines, as scaled down versions of combustion turbines, are one of the competitors in the range, which are widely under investigations from the aspects of thermodynamic analysis, economic feasibility and environmental impacts.

In order to efficient exploitation of the microturbine-based cogeneration potentials, proper planning especially in terms of the prime mover capacity and load curve is essential, because sensitivity to deviations from design target in microturbines is significant. Therefore, if the system is overestimated, the feasibility reduces and if underestimated, the effectiveness decreases (Beihong and Weiding, 2006). Operating in part-load condition is one major deviation, leading to decline in efficiency along with an increase in pollution level, especially when running under the 50% of full load (Canova et al., 2008). Hence, performance analysis of microturbines in part-load is crucial. For instance, study of part-load operation effects on the performance map of a microturbine-based cogeneration plant co-firing biomass and natural gas is carried out, revealing significant dependencies to the load changes (Riccio and Chiaramonti, 2009).

In addition to load, the effect of outdoor conditions such as inlet air pressure and temperature variation is investigated with Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) by Bartolini et al. (2011) and commercial process simulators together with experimental data and empirical correlations by Vidal et al. (2007).

Investigation of fuel cell/gas microturbine combined system, as a novel technology, covers another aspect of cogeneration. In this cycle, the fuel

Corresponding Author: Arezoo Khalili, Young Researchers Club, Saveh Branch, Islamic Azad University, Saveh, Iran 3953

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